Accumulation Patterns of Sub-chronic Aluminum Toxicity Model After Gastrointestinal Administration in Rats

  • Although aluminum chronic neurotoxicity is well documented, there are no well-established experimental protocols of Al exposure. In the current study, toxic effects of sub-chronic Al exposure have been evaluated in outbreed male rats (gastrointestinal administration). Forty animals were used: 10 were administered with AlCl3 water solution (2 mg/kg Al per day) for 1 month, 10 received the same concentration of AlCl3 for 3 month, and 20 (10 per observation period) saline as control. After 30 and 90 days, the animals underwent behavioral tests: open field, passive avoidance, extrapolation escape task, and grip strength. At the end of the study, the blood, liver, kidney, and brain were excised for analytical and morphological studies. The Al content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. Essential trace elements-Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn-were measured in whole blood samples. Although no morphological changes were observed in the brain, liver, or kidney for both exposure terms, dose-dependent AlAlthough aluminum chronic neurotoxicity is well documented, there are no well-established experimental protocols of Al exposure. In the current study, toxic effects of sub-chronic Al exposure have been evaluated in outbreed male rats (gastrointestinal administration). Forty animals were used: 10 were administered with AlCl3 water solution (2 mg/kg Al per day) for 1 month, 10 received the same concentration of AlCl3 for 3 month, and 20 (10 per observation period) saline as control. After 30 and 90 days, the animals underwent behavioral tests: open field, passive avoidance, extrapolation escape task, and grip strength. At the end of the study, the blood, liver, kidney, and brain were excised for analytical and morphological studies. The Al content was measured by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. Essential trace elements-Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Mo, Se, and Zn-were measured in whole blood samples. Although no morphological changes were observed in the brain, liver, or kidney for both exposure terms, dose-dependent Al accumulation and behavioral differences (increased locomotor activity after 30 days) between treatment and control groups were indicated. Moreover, for 30 days exposure, strong positive correlation between Al content in the brain and blood for individual animals was established, which surprisingly disappeared by the third month. This may indicate neural barrier adaptation to the Al exposure or the saturation of Al transport into the brain. Notably, we could not see a clear neurodegeneration process after rather prolonged sub-chronic Al exposure, so probably longer exposure periods are required.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author details:Evgenii J. DrobyshevORCiD, Nikolay D. SolovyevORCiD, Boris M. Gorokhovskiy, Vadim A. Kashuro
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s12011-018-1247-8
ISSN:0163-4984
ISSN:1559-0720
Pubmed ID:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=29441448
Title of parent work (English):Biological Trace Element Research
Publisher:Humana Press Inc.
Place of publishing:Totowa
Publication type:Article
Language:English
Date of first publication:2018/02/13
Completion year:2018
Release date:2021/09/14
Tag:Aluminum; Neurotoxicity; Per oral administration; Rats; Sub-chronic exposure; Trace elements
Volume:185
Issue:2
Number of pages:11
First page:384
Last Page:394
Funding institution:Russian Foundation for Basic ResearchRussian Foundation for Basic Research (RFBR) [16-33-60004 mol_a_dk]
Organizational units:Fakultät für Gesundheitswissenschaften
DDC classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit