The choice that matters: the relative influence of socioeconomic status indicators on chronic back pain- a longitudinal study

  • Background: In health research, indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) are often used interchangeably and often lack theoretical foundation. This makes it difficult to compare results from different studies and to explore the relationship between SES and health outcomes. To aid researchers in choosing appropriate indicators of SES, this article proposes and tests a theory-based selection of SES indicators using chronic back pain as a health outcome. Results: Chronic back pain intensity was best predicted by the multidimensional index (beta = 0.31, p < 0.05), followed by job position (beta = 0.29, p < 0.05) and education (beta = -0.29, p < 0.05); whereas, income exerted no significant influence. Back pain disability was predicted strongest by education (beta = -0.30, p < 0.05) and job position (beta = 0. 29, p < 0.05). Here, multidimensional index and income had no significant influence. Conclusions: The choice of SES indicators influences predictive power on both back pain dimensions, suggesting SES predictors cannot be usedBackground: In health research, indicators of socioeconomic status (SES) are often used interchangeably and often lack theoretical foundation. This makes it difficult to compare results from different studies and to explore the relationship between SES and health outcomes. To aid researchers in choosing appropriate indicators of SES, this article proposes and tests a theory-based selection of SES indicators using chronic back pain as a health outcome. Results: Chronic back pain intensity was best predicted by the multidimensional index (beta = 0.31, p < 0.05), followed by job position (beta = 0.29, p < 0.05) and education (beta = -0.29, p < 0.05); whereas, income exerted no significant influence. Back pain disability was predicted strongest by education (beta = -0.30, p < 0.05) and job position (beta = 0. 29, p < 0.05). Here, multidimensional index and income had no significant influence. Conclusions: The choice of SES indicators influences predictive power on both back pain dimensions, suggesting SES predictors cannot be used interchangeably. Therefore, researchers should carefully consider prior to each study which SES indicator to use. The introduced framework can be valuable in supporting this decision because it allows for a stable prediction of SES indicator influence and their hierarchy on a specific health outcomes.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Michael FliesserORCiDGND, Jessie De Witt HubertsORCiDGND, Pia-Maria WippertORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-017-2735-9
ISSN:1472-6963
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=29197372
Parent Title (English):BMC health services research
Publisher:BioMed Central
Place of publication:London
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2017
Year of Completion:2017
Release Date:2020/05/15
Tag:Indicators of socioeconomic status; chronic back pain; education; health inequality; income; job position; socioeconomic status
Volume:17
Pagenumber:8
Funder:Deutsche Rentenversicherung Berlin-Brandenburg [10-40.07.05.03.016]
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportmedizin und Prävention
Dewey Decimal Classification:6 Technik, Medizin, angewandte Wissenschaften / 61 Medizin und Gesundheit / 610 Medizin und Gesundheit
Peer Review:Referiert
Publication Way:Open Access
Open Access / Gold Open-Access
DOAJ gelistet
Licence (German):License LogoCreative Commons - Namensnennung, 4.0 International
Notes extern:Zweitveröffentlichung in der Schriftenreihe Postprints der Universität Potsdam : [Titel der Postprintreihe] ; [Ausgabe der Postprintreihe]