Landscape evolution in the western Indian Himalaya since the Miocene

Landschaftsentwicklung im westlichen indischen Himalaja seit dem Miozän

  • The Himalayan arc stretches >2500 km from east to west at the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, representing one of the most important Cenozoic continent-continent collisional orogens. Internal deformation processes and climatic factors, which drive weathering, denudation, and transport, influence the growth and erosion of the orogen. During glacial times wet-based glaciers sculpted the mountain range and left overdeepend and U-shaped valleys, which were backfilled during interglacial times with paraglacial sediments over several cycles. These sediments partially still remain within the valleys because of insufficient evacuation capabilities into the foreland. Climatic processes overlay long-term tectonic processes responsible for uplift and exhumation caused by convergence. Possible processes accommodating convergence within the orogenic wedge along the main Himalayan faults, which divide the range into four major lithologic units, are debated. In this context, the identification of processes shaping the Earth’s surface onThe Himalayan arc stretches >2500 km from east to west at the southern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, representing one of the most important Cenozoic continent-continent collisional orogens. Internal deformation processes and climatic factors, which drive weathering, denudation, and transport, influence the growth and erosion of the orogen. During glacial times wet-based glaciers sculpted the mountain range and left overdeepend and U-shaped valleys, which were backfilled during interglacial times with paraglacial sediments over several cycles. These sediments partially still remain within the valleys because of insufficient evacuation capabilities into the foreland. Climatic processes overlay long-term tectonic processes responsible for uplift and exhumation caused by convergence. Possible processes accommodating convergence within the orogenic wedge along the main Himalayan faults, which divide the range into four major lithologic units, are debated. In this context, the identification of processes shaping the Earth’s surface on short- and on long-term are crucial to understand the growth of the orogen and implications for landscape development in various sectors along the arc. This thesis focuses on both surface and tectonic processes that shape the landscape in the western Indian Himalaya since late Miocene. In my first study, I dated well-preserved glacially polished bedrock on high-elevated ridges and valley walls in the upper of the Chandra Valley the by means of 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic radionuclides (TCN). I used these ages and mapped glacial features to reconstruct the extent and timing of Pleistocene glaciation at the southern front of the Himalaya. I was able to reconstruct an extensive valley glacier of ~200 km length and >1000 m thickness. Deglaciation of the Chandra Valley glacier started subsequently to insolation increase on the Northern Hemisphere and thus responded to temperature increase. I showed that the timing this deglaciation onset was coeval with retreat of further midlatitude glaciers on the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. These comparisons also showed that the post-LGM deglaciation very rapid, occurred within a few thousand years, and was nearly finished prior to the Bølling/Allerød interstadial. A second study (co-authorship) investigates how glacial advances and retreats in high mountain environments impact the landscape. By 10Be TCN dating and geomorphic mapping, we obtained maximal length and height of the Siachen Glacier within the Nubra Valley. Today the Shyok and Nubra confluence is backfilled with sedimentary deposits, which are attributed to the valley blocking of the Siachen Glacier 900 m above the present day river level. A glacial dam of the Siachen Glacier blocked the Shyok River and lead to the evolution of a more than 20 km long lake. Fluvial and lacustrine deposits in the valley document alternating draining and filling cycles of the lake dammed by the Siachen Glacier. In this study, we can show that glacial incision was outpacing fluvial incision. In the third study, which spans the million-year timescale, I focus on exhumation and erosion within the Chandra and Beas valleys. In this study the position and discussed possible reasons of rapidly exhuming rocks, several 100-km away from one of the main Himalayan faults (MFT) using Apatite Fission Track (AFT) thermochronometry. The newly gained AFT ages indicate rapid exhumation and confirm earlier studies in the Chandra Valley. I assume that the rapid exhumation is most likely related to uplift over subsurface structures. I tested this hypothesis by combining further low-temperature thermochronometers from areas east and west of my study area. By comparing two transects, each parallel to the Beas/Chandra Valley transect, I demonstrate similarities in the exhumation pattern to transects across the Sutlej region, and strong dissimilarities in the transect crossing the Dhauladar Range. I conclude that the belt of rapid exhumation terminates at the western end of the Kullu-Rampur window. Therewith, I corroborate earlier studies suggesting changes in exhumation behavior in the western Himalaya. Furthermore, I discussed several causes responsible for the pronounced change in exhumation patterns along strike: 1) the role of inherited pre-collisional features such as the Proterozoic sedimentary cover of the Indian basement, former ridges and geological structures, and 2) the variability of convergence rates along the Himalayan arc due to an increased oblique component towards the syntaxis. The combination of field observations (geological and geomorphological mapping) and methods to constrain short- and long-term processes (10Be, AFT) help to understand the role of the individual contributors to exhumation and erosion in the western Indian Himalaya. With the results of this thesis, I emphasize the importance of glacial and tectonic processes in shaping the landscape by driving exhumation and erosion in the studied areas.show moreshow less
  • Der Himalaja, eines der wichtigsten känozoischen Kontinent-Kontinent Kollisionsgebirgen, erstreckt sich über 2500 km entlang des südlichen Randes des Tibetischen Plateaus von Ost nach West. Die Gebirgsbildung wird durch interne Deformationsprozesse und klimatische Faktoren, welche auf Verwitterung, Abtragung und Transport wirken, beeinflusst. In einem Zyklus von Eis- und Warmzeiten wurde die Landschaft durch Gletscher geformt. U-Täler sind noch heute erhaltene Spuren der Gletscher, die in den Warmzeiten durch abgetragene Sedimente verfüllt wurden. Diese Sedimente befinden sich teilweise bis heute in diesen übertieften Tälern, weil es an Kapazitäten zur Ausräumung der Täler ins Vorland mangelt. Die kurz-skaligen klimatischen Prozesse überlagern sich mit langzeitlichen tektonischen Prozessen wie Hebung und Exhumation, die durch Konvergenz verursacht werden. Im Zusammenhang mit dem Gebirgswachstum ist es entscheidend die Prozesse, welche die Erdoberfläche sowohl über kurze wie auch über längere Zeiträume formen zuDer Himalaja, eines der wichtigsten känozoischen Kontinent-Kontinent Kollisionsgebirgen, erstreckt sich über 2500 km entlang des südlichen Randes des Tibetischen Plateaus von Ost nach West. Die Gebirgsbildung wird durch interne Deformationsprozesse und klimatische Faktoren, welche auf Verwitterung, Abtragung und Transport wirken, beeinflusst. In einem Zyklus von Eis- und Warmzeiten wurde die Landschaft durch Gletscher geformt. U-Täler sind noch heute erhaltene Spuren der Gletscher, die in den Warmzeiten durch abgetragene Sedimente verfüllt wurden. Diese Sedimente befinden sich teilweise bis heute in diesen übertieften Tälern, weil es an Kapazitäten zur Ausräumung der Täler ins Vorland mangelt. Die kurz-skaligen klimatischen Prozesse überlagern sich mit langzeitlichen tektonischen Prozessen wie Hebung und Exhumation, die durch Konvergenz verursacht werden. Im Zusammenhang mit dem Gebirgswachstum ist es entscheidend die Prozesse, welche die Erdoberfläche sowohl über kurze wie auch über längere Zeiträume formen zu bestimmen und damit auch deren Auswirkungen auf die Landschaftsentwicklung in den einzelnen Abschnitten des Gebirgsbogens. Diese Dissertation fokussiert auf tektonische und Erdoberflächenprozesse, welche den westlichen indischen Himalaja seit dem Miozän geprägt und beeinflusst haben. In der ersten Studie, habe ich im oberen Chandratal mittels 10Be terrestrischen kosmogenen Nukliden (TCN) gut erhaltene vom Gletscher geschliffene und polierte Gesteinsoberflächen auf höher gelegenen Bergrücken und entlang der Talseiten datiert. Basierend auf diesen Altern und kartierten glazialen Landformen habe ich nicht nur die Ausdehnung, sondern auch den Zeitpunkt einer Vergletscherung an der südlichen Front des Himalajas rekonstruiert. Dieser rekonstruierte Gletscher hat im Chandratal eine maximale Länge von ~200 km und >1000 m Dicke erreicht. Die Enteisung des Chandratales folgte dem Anstieg der Sonneneinstrahlung und somit der Temperaturerwärmung auf der nördlichen Hemisphäre. Der Zeitpunkt des Enteisungsbeginns stimmt mit dem Rückgang weiterer Gletscher der mittleren Breiten auf der südlichen wie auch auf der nördlichen Hemisphäre überein. Diese Vergleiche zeigen auch, dass die Enteisung der letzteiszeitlichen Vergletscherung schon vor dem Bølling/Allerød Stadium nahezu abgeschlossen war. In einer zweiten Studie (Ko-Autorenschaft) wird untersucht, wie Gletscher die Erdoberfläche formen und wie Gletschervorstöße und -rückzüge die Landschaft in alpinen Regionen beeinflussen. Die maximale Länge des Siachen Gletschers im Nubratal wurde auf mehr als 180 km rekonstruiert. Heute ist der Zusammenfluss der Flüsse Shyok und Nubra mit Sedimenten verfüllt, deren Ablagerung mit einer Blockierung des Tales durch den Siachen Gletscher bis zu 900 m über der heutigen Flusshöhe zusammenhängen. Demzufolge, staute der Siachen Gletscher den Fluss Shyok. Fluviatile und lakustrine Ablagerungen im Tal dokumentieren sich wechselnde Entleerungs- und Auffüllungszyklen dieses Gletscherstausees. In dieser Studie, konnte ebenso gezeigt werden, dass fluviatile Erosion durch die glaziale Erosion überholt wird. Über den längeren Zeitraum (Jahrmillionen) fokussiere ich auf Exhumation und Erosion in den Tälern Chandra und Beas. In dieser dritten Studie war es mir möglich mittels Apatit-Spaltspurdatierung (AFT) die Lage und Gründe der schnellen Exhumation in diesem Bereich, einige hundert Kilometer entfernt einer der Hauptstörungen des Himalajas (MFT), zu beschreiben. Die neuen AFT Alter deuten auf schnelle Exhumation hin und bestätigen frühere Studien aus dem Chandratal. Ich vermute, dass diese schnelle Exhumation mit einer Bewegung über eine krustale Rampe im Zusammenhang steht, welche auch im östlich anschließenden Sutlej Tal ausgeprägt ist. Diese Hypothese wurde durch die Kombination weiterer tieftemperatur Thermochronometer aus benachbarten Gebieten untersucht. Durch den Vergleich zweier Profile, welche parallel zum Chandra/Beas-Profil laufen wurden im östliche gelegenen Sutlej Gebiet ähnliche Exhumationsmuster gefunden. Daraus schließe ich, das Ende es "rapid exhumation belt" westlich des Kullu-Rampur Fensters im Beastal und bestätige damit auch frühere Studien. Im Weiteren wurden verschiedene Gründe wie ehemalige prä-kollisionale Strukturen und Sedimentbecken oder die abnehmende frontale Konvergenz gegen Westen diskutiert, welche sich Möglicherweise verantwortlich zeichnen für den Wechsel des Exhumationsverhaltens entlang des Streichens des Himalaja. Die Kombination aus Feldbeobachtungen (geologische und geomorphologische Kartierung) und Methoden, die über kurze und längere Zeiträume Prozesse auflösen (10Be, AFT), unterstützen die Erkenntnisse über die Rollenverteilung der einzelnen Akteure bezüglich Exhumation und Erosion im westlichen indischen Himalaja. Die Ergebnisse dieser Doktorarbeit heben die Wichtigkeit glazialer als auch tektonischer Prozesse als Steuerelemente von Exhumation und Erosion im Studiengebiet hervor.show moreshow less

Download full text files

Export metadata

Additional Services

Share in Twitter Search Google Scholar Statistics
Metadaten
Author:Patricia EugsterORCiD
URN:urn:nbn:de:kobv:517-opus4-420329
Advisor:Manfred R. Strecker
Document Type:Doctoral Thesis
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2018
Year of Completion:2018
Publishing Institution:Universität Potsdam
Granting Institution:Universität Potsdam
Date of final exam:2018/07/02
Release Date:2018/12/06
Tag:Geologie; Gletscher; Himalaja; Thermochronologie; kosmogene Nuklide
Himalaya; cosmogenic nuclides; geology; glaciers; thermochronology
Pagenumber:XXI, 208
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Erd- und Umweltwissenschaften
Dewey Decimal Classification:5 Naturwissenschaften und Mathematik / 55 Geowissenschaften, Geologie / 550 Geowissenschaften
MSC Classification:86-XX GEOPHYSICS [See also 76U05, 76V05] / 86Axx Geophysics [See also 76U05, 76V05] / 86A40 Glaciology
86-XX GEOPHYSICS [See also 76U05, 76V05] / 86Axx Geophysics [See also 76U05, 76V05] / 86A60 Geological problems
Licence (German):License LogoKeine Nutzungslizenz vergeben - es gilt das deutsche Urheberrecht