Sex-Specific effects of surface instability on drop jump and landing biomechanics

  • This study investigated sex-specific effects of surface instability on kinetics and lower extremity kinematics during drop jumping and landing. Ground reaction forces as well as knee valgus and flexion angles were tested in 14 males (age: 23 +/- 2 years) and 14 females (age: 24 +/- 3 years) when jumping and landing on stable and unstable surfaces. Jump height was found to be significantly lower (9 %, p < 0.001) when drop jumps were performed on unstable vs. stable surface. Significantly higher peak ground reaction forces were observed when jumping was performed on unstable vs. stable surfaces (5 %, p = 0.022). Regarding frontal plane kinematics during jumping and landing, knee valgus angles were higher on unstable compared to stable surfaces (1932 %, p < 0.05). Additionally, at the onset of ground contact during landings, females showed higher knee valgus angles than males (222 %, p = 0.027). Sagittal plane kinematics indicated significantly smaller knee flexion angles (6-35 %, p < 0.05) when jumping and landing on unstable vs. stableThis study investigated sex-specific effects of surface instability on kinetics and lower extremity kinematics during drop jumping and landing. Ground reaction forces as well as knee valgus and flexion angles were tested in 14 males (age: 23 +/- 2 years) and 14 females (age: 24 +/- 3 years) when jumping and landing on stable and unstable surfaces. Jump height was found to be significantly lower (9 %, p < 0.001) when drop jumps were performed on unstable vs. stable surface. Significantly higher peak ground reaction forces were observed when jumping was performed on unstable vs. stable surfaces (5 %, p = 0.022). Regarding frontal plane kinematics during jumping and landing, knee valgus angles were higher on unstable compared to stable surfaces (1932 %, p < 0.05). Additionally, at the onset of ground contact during landings, females showed higher knee valgus angles than males (222 %, p = 0.027). Sagittal plane kinematics indicated significantly smaller knee flexion angles (6-35 %, p < 0.05) when jumping and landing on unstable vs. stable surfaces. During drop jumps and landings, women showed smaller knee flexion angles at ground contact compared to men (27-33 %, p < 0.05). These findings imply that knee motion strategies were modified by surface instability and sex during drop jumps and landings.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Olaf PrieskeORCiDGND, Thomas MuehlbauerORCiDGND, Tom KrügerORCiDGND, A. Kibele, D. Behm, Urs GranacherORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0034-1384549
ISSN:0172-4622 (print)
ISSN:1439-3964 (online)
Pubmed Id:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=25264860
Parent Title (English):International journal of sports medicine
Publisher:Thieme
Place of publication:Stuttgart
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2015
Year of Completion:2015
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:ground reaction force; injury risk; knee joint angle; stretch-shortening cycle
Volume:36
Issue:1
Pagenumber:7
First Page:75
Last Page:81
Organizational units:Humanwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Sportmedizin und Prävention
Peer Review:Referiert