Janus emulsions from a one-step process; optical microscopy images

  • The optical microscopy images of an emulsion are commonly distorted when viewed between a cover glass and a planar microscopy slide. An alternative method is to place the sample on a slide with a cavity, which in turn suffers from incomplete information for high internal phase ratio (HIPR) emulsions, due to the inevitable crowding of the drops. This problem is particularly acute for more complex emulsions, such as those with Janus drops, for which a detailed image of the drop is essential. A number of publications have recently described Janus emulsions prepared by a one-step high energy emulsification process with microscopy images obtained by the sample between a planar slide and a cover glass. The correlation to the morphology of emulsions in bulk of these images is critical, but, so far, a potential equivalence has not been established. Since the images are central in order to understand why Janus emulsions should form under such conditions, the need to ascertain any such association is urgent. With this contribution, we compareThe optical microscopy images of an emulsion are commonly distorted when viewed between a cover glass and a planar microscopy slide. An alternative method is to place the sample on a slide with a cavity, which in turn suffers from incomplete information for high internal phase ratio (HIPR) emulsions, due to the inevitable crowding of the drops. This problem is particularly acute for more complex emulsions, such as those with Janus drops, for which a detailed image of the drop is essential. A number of publications have recently described Janus emulsions prepared by a one-step high energy emulsification process with microscopy images obtained by the sample between a planar slide and a cover glass. The correlation to the morphology of emulsions in bulk of these images is critical, but, so far, a potential equivalence has not been established. Since the images are central in order to understand why Janus emulsions should form under such conditions, the need to ascertain any such association is urgent. With this contribution, we compare images from different microscopy methods to those of gently diluted HIPR emulsions. The results reveal that the images of the emulsion samples between a cover glass and a planar microscope slide actually present a realistic representation of the drop topology in bulk emulsions.show moreshow less

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Metadaten
Author:Hida Hasinovic, Cami Boggs, Stig E. Friberg, Ildiko Kovach, Joachim KoetzORCiDGND
DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/01932691.2013.801019
ISSN:0193-2691 (print)
ISSN:1532-2351 (online)
Parent Title (English):Journal of dispersion science and technology
Publisher:Taylor & Francis Group
Place of publication:Philadelphia
Document Type:Article
Language:English
Year of first Publication:2014
Year of Completion:2014
Release Date:2017/03/27
Tag:Emulsification; Janus drops; emulsion microscopy; microemulsions
Volume:35
Issue:5
Pagenumber:6
First Page:613
Last Page:618
Funder:Ugelstad Lavoratory, NTNU; Ashland Corporation
Organizational units:Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät / Institut für Chemie
Peer Review:Referiert